Son of Godzilla (1967)

From Wikizilla.org, the Godzilla, Gamera, Kong and Kaiju Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Article.png
Gallery.png
Soundtrack of Son of Godzilla


Godzilla Films
Ebirah, Horror of the Deep
Son of Godzilla
Destroy All Monsters
Toho Company, Limited Monster Movie
The Japanese poster for Son of Godzilla
Son of Godzilla
Directed by Produced by
Jun Fukuda Tomoyuki Tanaka
Written by Music by
Shinichi Sekizawa,
Kazue Shiba
Masaru Sato
Distributed by Rating
TohoJP
Walter Reade OrganizationUS
PGUS
Budget Box Office
$???,???,??? $2,554,240
Running Time
84 minutesJP
(1 hour, 24 minutes)
82 minutesUS
(1 hour, 22 minutes) 
Designs Used
MusukoGoji, ShodaiMinira, ShodaiKama, ShodaiKumo

Rate this film!
3.33
(21 votes)

Son of Godzilla (怪獣島の決戦 ゴジラの息子,   Kaijū-tō no Kessen: Gojira no Musuko?, lit. Monster Island's Decisive Battle: Godzilla's Son) is a 1967 tokusatsu kaiju film produced by Toho, and the eighth installment in the Godzilla series as well as the Showa series. The film was released to Japanese theaters on December 16, 1967.

Plot

A team of scientists stationed on Solgell Island attempts to perfect a weather control system. Their efforts are hampered by the presence of giant praying mantis-like creatures and by the arrival of a nosy reporter. The first test of the weather control system goes awry when the remote control for a radioactive balloon is jammed by an unexplained signal coming from the center of the island. The balloon detonates prematurely, creating a radioactive storm that causes the giant mantises to grow to enormous sizes. Investigating the mantises, now called Kamacuras, the scientists find the creatures digging an egg out from under a pile of earth. The egg hatches, revealing a baby Godzilla. The scientists realize that the baby's cries for help were the cause of the interference that ruined their experiment. Soon Godzilla himself arrives on the island, incidentally stomping the scientists' base as he rushes to defend his offspring. Godzilla kills two Kamacuras. One is killed by being beaten up in an action move based off of the Waltz, and the other is blown up by Godzilla's atomic breath.

The baby quickly grows to about half the size of his father, and Godzilla instructs the child on the important monster skills of roaring and using his radioactive breath. At first, the baby has difficulty producing anything more than smoke rings, but Godzilla discovers that stressful conditions, such as stomping on the baby's tail, produce a true radioactive blast. Dubbed Minilla, the baby comes to the aid of Saeko Matsumiya when she is attacked by a Kamacuras, but inadvertently awakens Kumonga, a giant spider. The spider attacks the caves where the scientists are hiding, and Minilla stumbles into the fray.

The scientists decide to complete their experiment, thereby freezing the monsters so they can escape. Godzilla comes to the aid of his offspring, and together the two are able to defeat Kumonga, with Minilla finally learning to control his radioactive blast. As the scientists escape to a waiting submarine they witness Minilla succumbing to the cold. Unable to abandon his offspring, Godzilla shelters his son in his arms, and the two fall unconscious. The scientists realize that the cold has placed the two monsters into a state of hibernation, but they will awaken once the snow melts and live in peace on the island.

Staff

Staff role on the left, staff member's name on the right.

Cast

Actor's name on the left, character played on the right.

Appearances

Monsters

Weapons, Vehicles, and Races

Gallery

Main article: Son of Godzilla/Gallery.

Soundtrack

Main article: Son of Godzilla (Soundtrack).

Alternate Titles

  • Monster Island's Decisive Battle: Godzilla's Son (Literal Japanese Title)
  • The Son of Godzilla (El hijo de Godzilla; Spain; Mexico; Il figlio di Godzilla; Italy; Syn Godzilla; Poland)
  • The Planet of the Monsters (La planète des monstres; France; French Belgium; De planeet der monsters; Dutch Belgium)
  • Frankenstein's Monster Hunt: Godzilla's Son (Frankensteins Monster jagen Godzillas Sohn; Germany)
  • Godzilla's Son (Godzillas son; Sweden)
  • Frankenstein's Island (Frankensteinin saari; Finland)

Theatrical Releases

View all posters for the film here.

  • Japan - December 16, 1967   [view poster]Japanese 1967 poster; August 1, 1973 (Re-Release)   [view poster]Japanese 1973 poster
  • United States - 1969 (TV)
  • Italy - 1969   [view poster]Italian poster
  • Germany - 1971   [view poster]German poster
  • Sweden - 1973
  • Finland - 1976
  • Netherlands - 1978
  • Spain   [view poster]Spanish poster
  • Mexico   [view poster]Mexican poster
  • Poland   [view poster]Polish poster

U.S. Release

American Son of Godzilla VHS cover

Like Ebirah, Horror of the Deep, Son of Godzilla was released directly to American television by the Walter Reade Organization in 1969, with an English dub recorded by Titan Productions, Inc. The only edit made to the film was the removal of the opening sequence where the crew of a military plane sees Godzilla swimming towards Solgell Island. It was replaced by a black screen with a red Son of Godzilla title card. The dub also makes numerous name changes. Kamacuras is called "Gimantis," Kumonga is called "Spiega," and Saeko Matsumiya is renamed "Reiko."

DVD and Blu-ray Releases

Toho DVD (2003)

  • Region: 2
  • Audio: Japanese

TriStar Pictures DVD (2004)[1]

  • Region: 1
  • Discs: 1
  • Audio: Japanese (2.0 Mono), English (2.0 Mono, international dub)
  • Special Features: Trailers
  • Notes: Out of print.

Madman DVD (2006)[2]

  • Region: 4
  • Discs: 1
  • Audio: Japanese, English

Box Office

When Son of Godzilla was released on December 16, 1967 in Japan, it sold 2,480,000 tickets. When the film was re-issued on August 1, 1973, it received 610,000 attendees, adding up to a rough attendance total of 3,090,000.

Reception

The film received mixed reviews. Critics enjoyed the style and monster fights, but thought the film was too childish. It currently owns a 67% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film sold 2,480,000 tickets. It was released for TV in the US in 1969, and was not screened for critics.

Videos

Son of Godzilla Japanese trailer

Trivia

  • Son of Godzilla is very similar to the previous year's Ebirah, Horror of the Deep. Both take place largely on a south Pacific island populated by monsters, and both include a "native girl" among the cast. Also, both end in a similar way, with the heroes waving goodbye to the monsters as the island is destroyed/frozen. The similarities are due to the faces behind the scenes that worked on both films, including director Jun Fukuda and music composer Masaru Sato.
  • The suit in this film, MusukoGoji, was used again in Godzilla vs. Gigan for the water scenes.
  • Son of Godzilla was re-released at the Summer Toho Champion Film Festival on August 1, 1973 alongside a theatrical version of episode 1 of Ultraman Taro titled Like the Sun, Mother of Ultra, and various cartoons.
  • The lever-action rifles used by the heroes resemble the Marlin Model 336.[3]

External Links

References

This is a list of references for Son of Godzilla. These citations are used to identify the reliable sources on which this article is based. These references appear inside articles in the form of superscript numbers, which look like this: [1]

Era Icon - Toho.png
Era Icon - Showa.png
Movie
Era Icon - Godzilla.png
Era Icon - Minilla.png
Era Icon - Kamacuras.png
Era Icon - Kumonga.png



Comments

Showing 2 comments. Remember to follow the civility guidelines when commenting.

You are not allowed to post comments.


avatar

Garfzilla

5 months ago
Score 0
My opinion: This is a likeable film at the least. I love Minilla, and many other new characters.
avatar

Toa Hydros

6 months ago
Score 0

My Thoughts: Son of Godzilla

  • Son of Godzilla is one of those films that has always been a mixed bag to me. On one hand, it has that cheesy camp value that makes the Showa series such a delight to watch. On the other hand, it has Minilla.

Like the previous few entries, the human characters are likable, though I'd be lying if I said they were the most interesting in the series.

Goji's new design is lackluster; its just a poofy mess. The Kamacarus and Kumonga puppets, on the other hand, are genuinely creepy in their movements. The monster action itself is pretty entertaining, from Godzilla putting the smackdown on the mantises, to him and Minilla double-teaming Kumonga.

Speaking of Minilla... ಠ_ಠ

Minilla is one of those love 'em or hate 'em characters, and... yeah I tend to lean toward the hate 'em side. As far as this film is concerned, my dislike mostly comes from his design, which is... pretty bad. As a character in the story, however, he's not THAT irritating here, he's pretty much what you'd expect: naive, big-eyed, curious, and all that. It's *shudders* "Godzilla's Revenge" that pretty much completely turned me against him.

Overall, if you can stomach Minilla at his least annoying and some-less-than spectacular costumes, this flick is entertaining enough.