User talk:Gojo2022

From Wikizilla, the kaiju encyclopedia
Jump to navigationJump to search

About this board

Not editable

What age demographics are the Showa and Heisei Godzilla films focused on?

3
Gojo2022 (talkcontribs)

So, I can’t fully say how soon I’m going to do this, but at some point, I plan to do full in-depth movie reviews on the Showa and Heisei Godzilla films and probably the same for other Toho properties, but what I needed to know in doing so, is what age group each of these films were considered for?

Like for example, it appears the first 9 “Showa Era” films in the other words the “golden age”, from 1954-1968 were considered films for adults and then we have the Toho Champion Festival for the last 6 from 1969-1975 which were considered for children. Then, all the Heisei films were for adult audiences again.

What puzzles me the most is “Son of Godzilla” and “Godzilla vs. Hedorah”.

I have heard some people say “Son of Godzilla” was actually a children’s film, but according to an interview with Jun Fukuda, when asked if Minya was meant to appeal towards children, he replied, “No it was just a new approach”.

As for “Godzilla vs. Hedorah”, there appears to be a large disagreement whether the film was actually suitable for children.  Some people claim because of the film’s presence in the “Toho Champion Festival” that it was. Others see the film having too many disturbing scenes and the anti-pollution message it sent being more on adult level and that a lot of people that saw this film as children had nightmares.  

So, any thoughts? Does anyone know what Toho directly said on what approach they were looking for on each individual film?

Also, if you know about the other films that Toho did that are non-Godzilla related on who they’re aimed for feel free to share.  I also think the solo Rodan and Mothra may have been intended for adults, while Space Amoeba might have been for children.

Ani Mate, the One-Headed Human (talkcontribs)

While Japanese demographics don’t necessarily work in the same way as they do in Western cultures, I’ll try my best to explain it.

Godzilla 1954 is a dark film with heavy themes surrounding nuclear weapons and so I would say that the film is intended for a more mature audience. I’d say the films from Raids Again to Destroy All Monsters are “age neutral”, they are more accessible to children compared to the original theme (mostly due to the lessened nuclear themes) though their is still somewhat of a maturity to them with the only real exception to that being Son. All Monsters Attack - Mechagodzilla ‘74 were targeted towards kids, this was partly due to the competing Gamera series, the Showa era was originally intended to end with DAM but the popularity of Godzilla and the rival Gamera franchise made Tomoyuki Tanaka continue the series, I would also guess this is why a child protagonist in AMA, Hedorah and Megalon were included. Terror of Mechagodzilla is an odd case because while it was still made for the Champion Festival, the darker aspects of the film partly due to the returning director Ishiro Honda make it stand out against the other 70s films.

As for the Heisei era films, they were originally intended to return the franchise to its darker roots as shown in the 1954 film, what may have helped is that the audience that grew up with the Showa era films were much older now. Though in the 1990s, much more children-based media was produced surrounding the Heisei series.

I would also like to note that the maturity of a project does not necessarily mean that it isn’t intended for children.

Gojo2022 (talkcontribs)

I'm glad to finally have someone address me on this, thanks again. It was just hard to tell because not everyone would say the same thing on which movie is for who.

I agree with everything you've said except the only thing I'd add is that I wouldn't say Terror is entirely serious and dark mind you. It has it's moments yes, but there are a lot of scenes that are pretty comedic such as Godzilla wiping the dirt off of him before continuing to fight Mechagodzilla and Titanosaurus and a lot of the human scenes and dialog did appear laughable at times.

Lists of alternate English dubbed versions of Godzilla films (1954-1995) (A project I worked on over a year ago)

3
Summary by Gojo2022

Godzilla: Dubbed by Jewell Enterprises and distributed by Trans World under the title: Godzilla King of the Monsters in 1956. Raymond Burr was added to the film and was added, nuclear message softened. It’s also included ending credits after the film is over. It can be seen it the 2006 Classic Media release DVD release and 2012\2019 Criterion DVD\Blu-Ray releases Curtain home video releases edited out the Trans World logo and ending credits.

Godzilla Raids Again: Dubbed by Warner Bros, and released under the title Gigantis: The Fire Monster in 1959. Godzilla was dubbed as, Gigantis throughout the entire film. His roar was also, mixed up with Anguirus’ making it confusing as to which monster was doing what, dialog was altered and so was most of the story. Music score was replaced. The DVD release from Classic Media in 2006, had the title card changed to the original film, but the alterations were still intact.

King Kong vs. Godzilla: Dubbed by Universal in 1963, Differences were adding in American actors, difference in music score, and several edits.

Mothra vs. Godzilla: Dubbed by AIP (American International Pictures), as Godzilla vs. the Thing, though Mothra’s name could still in heard, she was often called “The Thing” or “Mothra the Thing” throughout the film. This version added in footage shot for American audiences such as US Military helping Japanese Military, but still also contained edits, such as Torahota shooting Kumayama in the hotel room. Another American version used for Home Video releases, such as Simitar in 1998 a Classic Media in 2002 with a reversed title, Godzilla vs. Mothra used as the title card and Mothra only being referred to by her original name.

Ghidorah: The Three Headed Monster: While, I have yet to come across it, it did appear that there was an international dub (Some people call the international dubs, export dubs), as it there had been Turkish advertising materials that say so, and even had the film listed as Monster of Monsters, Ghidorah. Likely, a different dubbing casts was used than for the edited version by Continental. Edited version dubbed by Continental, as Ghidrah: The Three Headed Monster, in 1965. Once again, several edits occurred including the Godzilla and Rodan fighting sequence having swapped around at two points at least, Library music again replacing the original score and Ghidorah’s name being changed to “Ghidrah”. Later Home video releases in the 1990’s remove the Walter Reade logo and the ending title is changed from Yellow to White.

Invasion of Astro-Monster: This is the first film known to have an international dub, released as “Invasion of the Astro Monsters”. Dubbed by Glen Glenn Sound and released UPA (Untied Productions of America). Unlike, future international\export dubs this one was slightly edited from the original Japanese version. Such as the opening sequence was modified and such as Akira Ifukebe’s score from flying Godzilla and Rodan into space was used instead. Curtain missile scenes were also modified. Shown on Channel 4 in the UK in 1992, as well as released by Polygram that same year and again in 1998 by 4 Front Video. It’s dubbed track was eventually released in full by Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019 and released on HBO Max in 2020. UPA had a more edited down version called Monster Zero, with more edits in place including Planet X language removed. Some home video release in America in the 80’s and 90’s used the edited down version but changed the title card to “Godzilla vs. Monster Zero”. (Note: It’s also important to take notice that in the Japanese version the Nick Adams’ character Glen was dubbed by Goro Naya in the Japanese version but in the English versions, everyone lese but him is dubbed. Because as seen in the trailer, he rehearsed his lines in English, while Toho staff rehearsed in Japanese).

Ebirah: Horror of the Deep: International dub by Frontier Enterprises and was the first Godzilla film dubbed in English known to be complete without edits. This version, with its original title card can be found on VHS by Polygram in 1992 and 4 Front Video in 1998 in the UK. Also, shown on Channel 4 in the UK. Edited version with a different dub by AIP and title changed to Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster shown on US Television in 1967 and released on Home Video in early 80’s. including the opening sequence starting with Ebirah’s claw capturing and killing escaped prisoners with follow up narration. Later Home Video releases used an alternate “ending’” card in a different color, I think? I’ll have to come back to that later. I think it might be red instead of white? The version shown on MST3K, uses a different opening sequence with stock footage from Son of Godzilla and afterwards it’s the same edit. The DVD release from Sony in 2004 and Kraken Releasing in 2014, on both DVD and Blu-Ray. Use the uncut version with it’s original dub but the title still reads as, Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster.

Son of Godzilla: International dub by Frontier Enterprises currently available on home media. Original version with original titles and credits found on Channel 4 broadcast in the UK in 1992, and Home Video releases in 1992 and 1998 by Polygram and 4 Front Video respectively. It’s dubbed track was released by Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019 Slightly edited version with a different dub by AIP, released on US Television in 1968. Only changes are the title card is in orange instead of white and the opening credits are removed, but the footage behind the credits is intact, ending title IIRC, is also in orange. Later home video releases in the US have the ending title changed to white. The version released on DVD by Song in 2004 is the complete international version, but the opening title card is red instead of white or orange.

Destroy all Monsters: International dub by Frontier Enterprises currently available on home media. Released in the UK and US on VHS., shown on Channel 4 in 1992, released by ADV films in 1999 and 2004 respectively, and finally broadcasted on the Sci-Fi Channel from 1996-2006. It’s dubbed track was released by Media Blasters in 2011 and 2014 DVD and Blu-Ray and Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019

Slightly edited version with a different dub by AIP, released in the US, with yellow title card and opening credits are moved to the end of the film.  It’s dubbed dialog was formerly available through Media Blasters on DVD in 2011, but removed in the 2014 re-release.

All Monsters Attack: Slightly edited version dubbed by UPA and released by Maron Films under the title Godzilla’s Revenge and formerly test screened as Minya: the Son of Godzilla. It mainly removes, that god awful little ugly turd’s screeching song in the opening credits and released by a smooth jazz score. That horrible song was removed completely out of the film. Was available on VHS and DVD Home Media releases until 2008.

Godzilla vs. Hedorah: The international dub by Omni Productions, and starting here is where things get complicated as to which version came first. I’ll have to guess this on my own up until the end of the Showa era, so bear with me. I guess from here on out the dubs were either released later the same year or year after that. The VHS Carlton release in 1998 had Ken’s poem in Japanese text while speaking it outwardly in English. Both The version used in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 16mm in 1999 and the widescreen transfer from the Sci-Fi Channel from 1996-2006, had Ken’s poem in English Text, while he was saying it. Slightly edited version with a different dub by AIP, released in the US, under the title Godzilla vs. the Smog Monster in 1972, main differences are the song, Save the Earth is sung in English and the text at the end of the film reads “What if it could happen again?” instead of “And yet another one”? leaving room for the hint of an abandoned sequel also, in yellow text instead of white. The cut of the international version released by Sony in 2004 and Kraken Releasing in 2014, has Ken speaking, but the text of the poem is removed.

Godzilla vs. Gigan: The international dub by Omni Productions, the version the aired on the Sci-Fi Channel from 2002-2006, features Godzilla and Anguirus talking in deep English versions replacing the tape-recorded voices used in the Japanese version. But this is the only one that I know of that has the Japanese Speech Balloons intact. The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999, uses a different ending title that’s smaller. Both UK releases include a similar ending card type of ending card. Doesn’t have speech balloons. New World Video release has smaller ending, title card with different copyright information in 1994. The US theatrical version released by Cinema Shares in 1977 uses the same dubbing, but changes the title to Godzilla on Monster Island and includes some edits. The UK theatrical version titled War of the Monsters, also includes the same dubbing, but might have been edited future more than the Cinema Shares version released either late 70’s or early 80’s? I don’t really know. The Sony DVD release in 2004 and Kraken Releasing release in 2014, contain a green backdrop, replacing the blue, the matching Godzilla’s atomic breath. Also, features yet another different ending card, that is somewhat bigger.

Godzilla vs. Megalon: The international dub by Omni Productions, the version the aired on the Sci-Fi Channel from 2002-2006, includes original red title card and credits, but surprisingly no ending title card, just white copyright information. It’s dubbed track was released by Media Blasters in 2012 and 2014 DVD and Blu-Ray and Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019 The 1992 Channel 4 broadcasts and both VHS releases have all the film’s credits changed from red to white and has an end card. Also, should be noted that neither the 1992 Polygram release or 1998 4 Front Video release include the Toho opening and Toho Eizo logos, with the exception of the 1998 release having the Toho logo briefly with Gigan’s opening music instead before quickly fading into the film. Surprisingly, Media Blasters release shows this versions credits. Yet has both logos intact, even though there not on either release. The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999, has all the credits in red again and also is the only other version to include an ending title card, but this one’s in red. The US theatrical version released by Cinema Shares in 1976 uses the same dubbing, but is heavily edited and unfortunately, was released to death on American VHS and DVDs through the 80’s and 90’s in the worst quality possible by several illegal fly-by-night bootleggers. The film was edited down to an hour for being shown on Saturday Night Live. I’m not sure if it included anything that Cinema Shares cut out or if it just edited more than what was already cut. (Note: It had been rumored that an uncut copy of this dubbed version was released in America, but has yet to surface. Also, should note, that though neither company released it that both New World and Sony intended to release the film, but likely failed due to certain budget reasons).

Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions, the version the aired on the Sci-Fi Channel from 2002-2006, copyright information appears after the film’s ending titles. The Carlton release from 1998 on VHS shows the Toho Eizo logo appearing a few seconds after the blue backdrop shows up. It’s dubbed track is included on Blu-Ray by Criterion in 2019 The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999 with only noticeable differences besides aspect ratio, being the titles and credits slightly different. The US theatrical version released by Cinema Shares in 1977 uses the same dubbing, but is heavily edited and title changed to Godzilla vs. the Bionic Monster, formerly, but quickly changed to Godzilla vs. the Cosmic Monster, due to legal reasons. They both likely are the same, just titled differently. Some copies of the Cinema Shares version include, Bazil’s Goro’s artwork by the title card. The copies from New World Video and early Sci-Fi Channel airings don’t have an end card. Previously, the Sci-Fi Channel showed a Fullscreen version of the film, under the title Godzilla vs. the Cosmic Monster, except it’s not the Cinema Shares version, it’s the more complete version. However, it’s still slightly censored as removing, Shimizo’s hand bleeding after being cut and Nabara’s “bastard line” it ran from 1994-2001, before being replaced by the full version. The Sony release in 2004 removes the scream at the oil factory and the line ‘Move over”

Terror of Mechagodzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions, and honestly, I’m not sure where you can find it in widescreen and complete. It’s dubbed track is included on Blu-Ray by Criterion in 2019 The film was shown uncut on Channel 4 in the UK in 1992, followed by VHS release in 1992 and 1998 by Polygram and 4 Front Video. Like, Megalon, the Polygram release doesn’t include the opening logos and “I don’t have a copy of the 4 Front Video release” but I assume it has the Toho logo with Gigan music and its original and not Toho Eizo logo as well? The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999 is the only one I know that’s complete and in English. The US theatrical version released by Bob Conn Enterprises, adapted the original dub like Cinema Shares did with the previous three films and also like them they made several edits. The title was originally changed to Terror of Godzilla in 1978. The UK theatrical version titled Monsters from a Prehistoric Planet also includes the same dubbing, but I think it’s probably the same edit as the Bob Conn one. Like the edited Gigan I’m taking the estimated guess that it was between the late 70’s or early 80’s? I don’t really know. The titles and credits were also in red instead of white. The film was used later released by UPA, who made an extended version with a 10-minute prolog that uses stock footage from Astro Monsters, Ebriah and Son with added narration. Only the scene of Katsura’s breasts is cut. Released on DVD by Classic Media in 2008. Later versions shown on Television in the 80’s had, the same edit as the Bob Conn Enterprises version except the title was changed back to Terror of Mechagodzilla. Three other versions that appeared on home media releases should be noted one were the title card was moved from the inside of the building to front of Mechagodzilla, another with a yellow title card and one that’s doesn’t have one. Ending title also varied.

The Return of Godzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by Carlton in 1998 in the UK The film was redubbed a year later, by New World Pictures, similar to what was done to the 1954 Godzilla and was retitled Godzilla 1985. Raymond Burr was added into the film and several changes were made to match the Godzilla King of the Monsters dub in 1956. Some VHS copies, included the hilarious Bambi Meets Godzilla 1969 short, while others don’t. The international dubbed track in included on the Kraken Releasing DVD and Blu-Ray, but is in DTS, surround Sound instead of Stereo. As, while as different music tracks.

Godzilla vs. Biollante: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by HBO in 1992.

Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by Yamato Video in Italy sometime in the 90’s. It was also released by Manga Video in the UK in 1998, but both the Toho and Toho Eigo logos were removed. Currently Sony released the film in 1998 on VHS, DVD and Blu-Ray without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one.

Godzilla vs. Mothra: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by Yamato Video in Italy sometime in the 90’s. It was also released by Manga Video in the UK in 1998, but both the Toho and Toho Eigo logos were removed. Sony released the film in 1998 and retitled it Godzilla and Mothra: The Battle for Earth. On the VHS and DVD releases without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released it and only retained the first Toho logo.

Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II: The international dub by Omni Productions was supposedly released complete by a Polish Company, but there’s not been any more information regarding that, that I know of. Sony released the film in 1999 to VHS and 2004 to DVD without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released almost the complete version, but still doesn’t have either of the Toho logos.

Godzilla vs. Spacegodzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions, was shown on Television stations complete, but not released on home video until 2014. Sony released the film in 1999 to VHS and DVD without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released the complete version. It should also be noticed that some Television stations and some streaming sites including Crackle don’t include the dialog where G-Force is setting up Moguera the edited VHs and DVD releases were like that as well.

Godzilla vs. Destoroyah: The international dub by Omni Productions, was shown on Television stations complete, but not released on home video until 2014. Sony released the film in 1999 to VHS and DVD without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released the complete version.

Gojo2022 (talkcontribs)

Godzilla: Dubbed by Jewell Enterprises and distributed by Trans World under the title: Godzilla King of the Monsters in 1956. Raymond Burr was added to the film and was added, nuclear message softened. It’s also included ending credits after the film is over. It can be seen it the 2006 Classic Media release DVD release and 2012\2019 Criterion DVD\Blu-Ray releases Curtain home video releases edited out the Trans World logo and ending credits. Godzilla Raids Again: Dubbed by Warner Bros, and released under the title Gigantis: The Fire Monster in 1959. Godzilla was dubbed as, Gigantis throughout the entire film. His roar was also, mixed up with Anguirus’ making it confusing as to which monster was doing what, dialog was altered and so was most of the story. Music score was replaced. The DVD release from Classic Media in 2006, had the title card changed to the original film, but the alterations were still intact. King Kong vs. Godzilla: Dubbed by Universal in 1963, Differences were adding in American actors, difference in music score, and several edits. Mothra vs. Godzilla: Dubbed by AIP (American International Pictures), as Godzilla vs. the Thing, though Mothra’s name could still in heard, she was often called “The Thing” or “Mothra the Thing” throughout the film. This version added in footage shot for American audiences such as US Military helping Japanese Military, but still also contained edits, such as Torahota shooting Kumayama in the hotel room. Another American version used for Home Video releases, such as Simitar in 1998 a Classic Media in 2002 with a reversed title, Godzilla vs. Mothra used as the title card and Mothra only being referred to by her original name. Ghidorah: The Three Headed Monster: While, I have yet to come across it, it did appear that there was an international dub (Some people call the international dubs, export dubs), as it there had been Turkish advertising materials that say so, and even had the film listed as Monster of Monsters, Ghidorah. Likely, a different dubbing casts was used than for the edited version by Continental. Edited version dubbed by Continental, as Ghidrah: The Three Headed Monster, in 1965. Once again, several edits occurred including the Godzilla and Rodan fighting sequence having swapped around at two points at least, Library music again replacing the original score and Ghidorah’s name being changed to “Ghidrah”. Later Home video releases in the 1990’s remove the Walter Reade logo and the ending title is changed from Yellow to White. Invasion of Astro-Monster: This is the first film known to have an international dub, released as “Invasion of the Astro Monsters”. Dubbed by Glen Glenn Sound and released UPA (Untied Productions of America). Unlike, future international\export dubs this one was slightly edited from the original Japanese version. Such as the opening sequence was modified and such as Akira Ifukebe’s score from flying Godzilla and Rodan into space was used instead. Curtain missile scenes were also modified. Shown on Channel 4 in the UK in 1992, as well as released by Polygram that same year and again in 1998 by 4 Front Video. It’s dubbed track was eventually released in full by Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019 and released on HBO Max in 2020. UPA had a more edited down version called Monster Zero, with more edits in place including Planet X language removed. Some home video release in America in the 80’s and 90’s used the edited down version but changed the title card to “Godzilla vs. Monster Zero”. (Note: It’s also important to take notice that in the Japanese version the Nick Adams’ character Glen was dubbed by Goro Naya in the Japanese version but in the English versions, everyone lese but him is dubbed. Because as seen in the trailer, he rehearsed his lines in English, while Toho staff rehearsed in Japanese). Ebirah: Horror of the Deep: International dub by Frontier Enterprises and was the first Godzilla film dubbed in English known to be complete without edits. This version, with its original title card can be found on VHS by Polygram in 1992 and 4 Front Video in 1998 in the UK. Also, shown on Channel 4 in the UK. Edited version with a different dub by AIP and title changed to Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster shown on US Television in 1967 and released on Home Video in early 80’s. including the opening sequence starting with Ebirah’s claw capturing and killing escaped prisoners with follow up narration. Later Home Video releases used an alternate “ending’” card in a different color, I think? I’ll have to come back to that later. I think it might be red instead of white? The version shown on MST3K, uses a different opening sequence with stock footage from Son of Godzilla and afterwards it’s the same edit. The DVD release from Sony in 2004 and Kraken Releasing in 2014, on both DVD and Blu-Ray. Use the uncut version with it’s original dub but the title still reads as, Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster. Son of Godzilla: International dub by Frontier Enterprises currently available on home media. Original version with original titles and credits found on Channel 4 broadcast in the UK in 1992, and Home Video releases in 1992 and 1998 by Polygram and 4 Front Video respectively. It’s dubbed track was released by Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019 Slightly edited version with a different dub by AIP, released on US Television in 1968. Only changes are the title card is in orange instead of white and the opening credits are removed, but the footage behind the credits is intact, ending title IIRC, is also in orange. Later home video releases in the US have the ending title changed to white. The version released on DVD by Song in 2004 is the complete international version, but the opening title card is red instead of white or orange. Destroy all Monsters: International dub by Frontier Enterprises currently available on home media. Released in the UK and US on VHS., shown on Channel 4 in 1992, released by ADV films in 1999 and 2004 respectively, and finally broadcasted on the Sci-Fi Channel from 1996-2006. It’s dubbed track was released by Media Blasters in 2011 and 2014 DVD and Blu-Ray and Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019

Slightly edited version with a different dub by AIP, released in the US, with yellow title card and opening credits are moved to the end of the film.  It’s dubbed dialog was formerly available through Media Blasters on DVD in 2011, but removed in the 2014 re-release.

All Monsters Attack: Slightly edited version dubbed by UPA and released by Maron Films under the title Godzilla’s Revenge and formerly test screened as Minya: the Son of Godzilla. It mainly removes, that god awful little ugly turd’s screeching song in the opening credits and released by a smooth jazz score. That horrible song was removed completely out of the film. Was available on VHS and DVD Home Media releases until 2008. Godzilla vs. Hedorah: The international dub by Omni Productions, and starting here is where things get complicated as to which version came first. I’ll have to guess this on my own up until the end of the Showa era, so bear with me. I guess from here on out the dubs were either released later the same year or year after that. The VHS Carlton release in 1998 had Ken’s poem in Japanese text while speaking it outwardly in English. Both The version used in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 16mm in 1999 and the widescreen transfer from the Sci-Fi Channel from 1996-2006, had Ken’s poem in English Text, while he was saying it. Slightly edited version with a different dub by AIP, released in the US, under the title Godzilla vs. the Smog Monster in 1972, main differences are the song, Save the Earth is sung in English and the text at the end of the film reads “What if it could happen again?” instead of “And yet another one”? leaving room for the hint of an abandoned sequel also, in yellow text instead of white. The cut of the international version released by Sony in 2004 and Kraken Releasing in 2014, has Ken speaking, but the text of the poem is removed. Godzilla vs. Gigan: The international dub by Omni Productions, the version the aired on the Sci-Fi Channel from 2002-2006, features Godzilla and Anguirus talking in deep English versions replacing the tape-recorded voices used in the Japanese version. But this is the only one that I know of that has the Japanese Speech Balloons intact. The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999, uses a different ending title that’s smaller. Both UK releases include a similar ending card type of ending card. Doesn’t have speech balloons. New World Video release has smaller ending, title card with different copyright information in 1994. The US theatrical version released by Cinema Shares in 1977 uses the same dubbing, but changes the title to Godzilla on Monster Island and includes some edits. The UK theatrical version titled War of the Monsters, also includes the same dubbing, but might have been edited future more than the Cinema Shares version released either late 70’s or early 80’s? I don’t really know. The Sony DVD release in 2004 and Kraken Releasing release in 2014, contain a green backdrop, replacing the blue, the matching Godzilla’s atomic breath. Also, features yet another different ending card, that is somewhat bigger. Godzilla vs. Megalon: The international dub by Omni Productions, the version the aired on the Sci-Fi Channel from 2002-2006, includes original red title card and credits, but surprisingly no ending title card, just white copyright information. It’s dubbed track was released by Media Blasters in 2012 and 2014 DVD and Blu-Ray and Criterion on Blu-Ray in 2019 The 1992 Channel 4 broadcasts and both VHS releases have all the film’s credits changed from red to white and has an end card. Also, should be noted that neither the 1992 Polygram release or 1998 4 Front Video release include the Toho opening and Toho Eizo logos, with the exception of the 1998 release having the Toho logo briefly with Gigan’s opening music instead before quickly fading into the film. Surprisingly, Media Blasters release shows this versions credits. Yet has both logos intact, even though there not on either release. The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999, has all the credits in red again and also is the only other version to include an ending title card, but this one’s in red. The US theatrical version released by Cinema Shares in 1976 uses the same dubbing, but is heavily edited and unfortunately, was released to death on American VHS and DVDs through the 80’s and 90’s in the worst quality possible by several illegal fly-by-night bootleggers. The film was edited down to an hour for being shown on Saturday Night Live. I’m not sure if it included anything that Cinema Shares cut out or if it just edited more than what was already cut. (Note: It had been rumored that an uncut copy of this dubbed version was released in America, but has yet to surface. Also, should note, that though neither company released it that both New World and Sony intended to release the film, but likely failed due to certain budget reasons). Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions, the version the aired on the Sci-Fi Channel from 2002-2006, copyright information appears after the film’s ending titles. The Carlton release from 1998 on VHS shows the Toho Eizo logo appearing a few seconds after the blue backdrop shows up. It’s dubbed track is included on Blu-Ray by Criterion in 2019 The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999 with only noticeable differences besides aspect ratio, being the titles and credits slightly different. The US theatrical version released by Cinema Shares in 1977 uses the same dubbing, but is heavily edited and title changed to Godzilla vs. the Bionic Monster, formerly, but quickly changed to Godzilla vs. the Cosmic Monster, due to legal reasons. They both likely are the same, just titled differently. Some copies of the Cinema Shares version include, Bazil’s Goro’s artwork by the title card. The copies from New World Video and early Sci-Fi Channel airings don’t have an end card. Previously, the Sci-Fi Channel showed a Fullscreen version of the film, under the title Godzilla vs. the Cosmic Monster, except it’s not the Cinema Shares version, it’s the more complete version. However, it’s still slightly censored as removing, Shimizo’s hand bleeding after being cut and Nabara’s “bastard line” it ran from 1994-2001, before being replaced by the full version. The Sony release in 2004 removes the scream at the oil factory and the line ‘Move over” Terror of Mechagodzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions, and honestly, I’m not sure where you can find it in widescreen and complete. It’s dubbed track is included on Blu-Ray by Criterion in 2019 The film was shown uncut on Channel 4 in the UK in 1992, followed by VHS release in 1992 and 1998 by Polygram and 4 Front Video. Like, Megalon, the Polygram release doesn’t include the opening logos and “I don’t have a copy of the 4 Front Video release” but I assume it has the Toho logo with Gigan music and its original and not Toho Eizo logo as well? The version in Fullscreen by the Taiwanese Power Multimedia DVD in 1999 is the only one I know that’s complete and in English. The US theatrical version released by Bob Conn Enterprises, adapted the original dub like Cinema Shares did with the previous three films and also like them they made several edits. The title was originally changed to Terror of Godzilla in 1978. The UK theatrical version titled Monsters from a Prehistoric Planet also includes the same dubbing, but I think it’s probably the same edit as the Bob Conn one. Like the edited Gigan I’m taking the estimated guess that it was between the late 70’s or early 80’s? I don’t really know. The titles and credits were also in red instead of white. The film was used later released by UPA, who made an extended version with a 10-minute prolog that uses stock footage from Astro Monsters, Ebriah and Son with added narration. Only the scene of Katsura’s breasts is cut. Released on DVD by Classic Media in 2008. Later versions shown on Television in the 80’s had, the same edit as the Bob Conn Enterprises version except the title was changed back to Terror of Mechagodzilla. Three other versions that appeared on home media releases should be noted one were the title card was moved from the inside of the building to front of Mechagodzilla, another with a yellow title card and one that’s doesn’t have one. Ending title also varied. The Return of Godzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by Carlton in 1998 in the UK The film was redubbed a year later, by New World Pictures, similar to what was done to the 1954 Godzilla and was retitled Godzilla 1985. Raymond Burr was added into the film and several changes were made to match the Godzilla King of the Monsters dub in 1956. Some VHS copies, included the hilarious Bambi Meets Godzilla 1969 short, while others don’t. The international dubbed track in included on the Kraken Releasing DVD and Blu-Ray, but is in DTS, surround Sound instead of Stereo. As, while as different music tracks. Godzilla vs. Biollante: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by HBO in 1992. Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by Yamato Video in Italy sometime in the 90’s. It was also released by Manga Video in the UK in 1998, but both the Toho and Toho Eigo logos were removed. Currently Sony released the film in 1998 on VHS, DVD and Blu-Ray without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. Godzilla vs. Mothra: The international dub by Omni Productions was fully released on VHS by Yamato Video in Italy sometime in the 90’s. It was also released by Manga Video in the UK in 1998, but both the Toho and Toho Eigo logos were removed. Sony released the film in 1998 and retitled it Godzilla and Mothra: The Battle for Earth. On the VHS and DVD releases without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released it and only retained the first Toho logo. Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II: The international dub by Omni Productions was supposedly released complete by a Polish Company, but there’s not been any more information regarding that, that I know of. Sony released the film in 1999 to VHS and 2004 to DVD without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released almost the complete version, but still doesn’t have either of the Toho logos. Godzilla vs. Spacegodzilla: The international dub by Omni Productions, was shown on Television stations complete, but not released on home video until 2014. Sony released the film in 1999 to VHS and DVD without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released the complete version. It should also be noticed that some Television stations and some streaming sites including Crackle don’t include the dialog where G-Force is setting up Moguera the edited VHs and DVD releases were like that as well. Godzilla vs. Destoroyah: The international dub by Omni Productions, was shown on Television stations complete, but not released on home video until 2014. Sony released the film in 1999 to VHS and DVD without any of the opening logos and ending credits. The English title card is also super imposed over the Japanese one. However, in 2014, Sony released the complete version.

Ani Mate, the One-Headed Human (talkcontribs)

Ok, you’ve got a few things wrong here. I would first like to note that just because a Distributor is distributing a movie in a certain region, it does not mean they produced the dubs themselves, in the case of these films (and many others) the dubs were recorded by a separate company specialising in English dubbing. Though you are correct about Frontier producing the English dubs of Ebirah, Son and DAM.

Ryder Sound Service, Inc provided the American English dubs for Raids Again/Gigantis, King Kong vs. Godzilla, All Monsters Attack/Godzilla’s Revenge and Godzilla 1985.

Titra Sound Studios/ Titan Productions, Inc. provided the American English dubs for Mothra vs. Godzilla/Godzilla vs. The Thing, Ebirah/Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster, Son of Godzilla, Destroy All Monsters and Godzilla vs. Hedorah/Smog Monster.

Bellucci Productions provided the American English dub for Ghidorah/Ghidrah

Omni Productions DID NOT produce the Interntional English dubs for Hedorah, Gigan, Megalon, Mechagodzilla’74, Terror or Return. Also, despite featuring Rik Thomas, Biollante-Mothra have never had a confirmed dubbing studio, it is also known that Rik Thomas would do work for other dubbing companies as shown with his involvement in the Final Wars dub despite that one being produced by “Red Angel Media”. Only Mechagodzilla II, SpaceGodzilla, Destoroyah and 2000: Millennium’s unreleased International English dubs have been confirmed to by Omni.

Atlas International (Hong Kong) provided the International English dubs for Godzilla vs. Hedorah, Godzilla vs. Gigan and Godzilla vs. Megalon.

Either Barry Haigh or Matthew Oram’s dubbing company (both in Hong Kong) provided the International English dubs for Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla ‘74, Terror of Mechagodzilla and The Return of Godzilla.

Gojo2022 (talkcontribs)

Yeah that guide I was trying to make (which accidently appeared on here twice and I never figured out how to delete the duplicate) was made almost two years ago on a site that I tried to make for a group and it never went anywhere. So I reposted it here. As, I felt people that actually cared about this kind of stuff would be more into it here.

Furthermore, it had been so long since I've seen or heard of anyone that was interested in it that I started by own guide from scratch and couldn't fully remember every company dubber or distributor, so I went by the best of my memory to try to figure it out without help, since I didn't really know anybody personally back then.

Thanks for the corrections though, I very much appreciate it.

Does anyone know where to find this deleted scene to Godzilla vs. Spacegodzilla?

4
Gojo2022 (talkcontribs)

There's a lot of deleted scenes from the Heisei Godzilla films mainly the last three. So far I think I found them all and even considered at some point doing extended cuts to them by editing scenes back in to the movies where those parts where cut out. So while I found the original ending to Godzilla vs. Destoroyah, where Godzilla kills Destoroyah before he dies through my old video collection. I couldn't find anywhere probably the saddest most baffling scene in a Godzilla film to ever be cut out and that's where in Godzilla vs. Spacegodzilla, after Spacegodzilla lures Godzilla's son Junior into the crystal prison, Godzilla unsuccessfully tries to get him out. See the link in the picture below.

https://twitter.com/GodzillaLets/status/1359624191826415618


Long story short there's of course the scene you can find where he breaks free of the prison after Spacegodzilla dies, but is there by chance any home video copy that has this missing scene? Sadly the copy I got doesn't have it but has every other deleted scene which is weird.

Astounding Beyond Belief (talkcontribs)

None that I'm aware of

Gojo2022 (talkcontribs)

No one that I've asked seems to know where to find that scene which is weird, because how else were some people able to get a photo of it, if footage of that whole scene hasn't surfaced?

Astounding Beyond Belief (talkcontribs)

Could be a set photo instead of a frame from the footage. There's a similar shot in Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla Complete Works, for whatever that's worth. The deleted scenes you see on home video releases seldom include everything that was cut from a given film (though I agree that leaving out this particular scene is bizarre).

There are no older topics